THE INFLUENCE OF SEX ON THE FREQUENCY OF CLINICAL SYMPTOMS IN BEHCET’S DISEASE.


Abstract: Introduction: It is known from long date that some manifestations are seen more frequently in men than women and in some of them the difference may be statistically significant. The aim of this study was to address that issue and to find if a statistical difference was of any clinical relevance or significance Materials and Methods: All patients of the BD registry (4717 at January 20, 2002) entered the study. One hundred and five symptoms and signs were compared in men and women. The statistical comparison was made by the c2 test. Only those who had a statistically significant difference exceeding 5% will be reported by male/female percentages. Due to the large number of patients a 2% difference gave a statistical significant difference. Results: Genital aphthosis 62/69, Behcet’s Pustulosis 69/53, anterior uveitis 46/36, posterior uveitis 51/38, retinal vasculitis 36/24, joint manifestations 37/32, phlebitis 9/3, complete form of Japan classification criteria 28/18. A statistical significant difference was also reached by erythema nodosum, skin aphthosis, cataract, gastrointestinal disorders, central nervous system manifestations, B5, arterial aneurysm, large vein thrombosis, and superficial phlebitis, but the difference was less than 5%. Conclusion: The only symptom that was seen more frequently in women was genital aphthosis. The major differences between male and female were for Behcet’s Pustulosis (15%) and ocular manifestations (13%). There was no clinical significant difference for other symptoms who had a statistical significant difference (less than 5% difference).